2019 Conference: Institutions of African Literature

2019 CFPs for Panels, Roundtables, Seminars

Contemporary Lessons from Official Festivals
Session type:
Panel
Organized by: Adeola Adijat Faleye, PhD
Send abstracts or inquiries to:
yeyeadeola2016@gmail.com

The proposed panel will focus on the contemporary lessons that we can learn from official festivals in African and the Diaspora. The Panel will also consider the socio-cultural factors that determine the institutionalization of festivals, their forms, genres and styles, eco-tourism and festivals, and the future of festivals in Africa and the Diaspora.
Main Areas of Focus include:
- A Socio-cultural Review of Official Festivals
- Forms, Genres and Styles of Festivals
- Eco-Cultural Tourism and Festivals
- The Future of Festivals.
Please send abstracts of not more than 300 words to : yeyeadeola2016@gmail.com or adefaleye2014@yahoo.co.uk

Production and circulation of Afro-Hispanophone/ Lusophone performing and visual arts
Session type:
Panel
Organized by: Stefania Licata
Send abstracts or inquiries to:
stefania.licata@converse.edu

African dance, theater, music as well as photography, paintings, handcrafts and so on have been and are central to the understanding of African(s) culture(s) within its continent and in the continuous movement through past and present diaspora and/or migration. This session seeks to explore the links between production and circulation of Afro-Hispanophone/Lusophone artists in Europe, Latin America, and within Africa with a specific focus on performing and visual arts as a form of knowledge and narration of local and global realities. An interdisciplinary or comparative approach is also encouraged.

Please submit a 200 word abstract in English, Spanish or Portuguese and a short bio to Stefania Licata, Converse College, Stefania.licata@converse.edu by January 28th.

Literature and the Perspectival Sensorium
Session type:
Panel
Organized by: Ato Quayson
Send abstracts or inquiries to:
aq10@nyu.edu

This panel will be focused on the relation between African literature and representations of the perspectival sensorium of touch, smell, kinetics, hearing, etc. In what ways do African literary texts appeal to or invoke the perspectival sensorium? Topics may include:

-- Ekphrasis, painting and African writing.
-- Representations of sensorial overload. For example in the work of Tayeb Salih, Wole Soyinka, Yvonne Vera, Dambudzo Marechera, Assia Djebar, Tsitsi Dangarembga, and others, moments of deeply entangled ethical choice are typically accompanied by heightened appeals to the senses. How do we evaluate these?
-- Orality and the senses.
-- Food, taste, and the senses.
-- Horror, enchantment, and the senses.

Papers committed to careful and detailed contextualization of the senses are welcome, as well as those that are able to make some theoretical statements drawing on concrete examples.

Abstracts of no more than $300 words should be sent to Ato Quayson on to reach him no later than January 30th, 2019.

Space, Culture, and Interdisciplinarity
Session type:
Organized by: Ato Quayson
Send abstracts or inquiries to:
aq10@nyu.edu

This panel will be focused on the intersections between spatial theory and African literature and the ways in which we might extrapolate from African literature and culture for thinking about space and society. Topics might include:

-- What ways do spatial ideas contained in oral discourse allow us to interpret African literature differently?
-- What are the differences in notions of space in works with predominantly rural settings as opposed to those with largely urban settings?
-- How does African literature treat the question of boredom or being stuck? And what are the spatial dimensions of this?
-- In what ways do popular genres such as African music and film reflect questions of spatial longing and nostalgia (of a pristine past, of "abroad" or an ever better elsewhere, or of diaspora?) and how might these be theorized?
-- What is the difference between "dead space" (i.e., where nothing seems to happen and that appears to form the mere background to unfolding events) and the space of eventfulness (the road, the forest, the threshold between the real and the esoteric, etc.)?
-- How do spatial concepts -- such as chronotopes, spatial morphology, the infrastructure of contingency, means of locomotion, utopias and dystopias, and anamorphism -- help us interpret African literary and cultural texts?

Proposals with a thorough and sophisticated understanding of spatial theory would be much welcome as would those that are able to read African literary and cultural texts to extrapolate about spatial thinking.

Titles and abstracts of up to 300 words should be sent to the organizer on

Publishing in the Field of African Literature: Old and New Paradigms
Session type:
Roundtable
Organized by: Mukoma Wa Ngugi
Send abstracts or inquiries to:
mukomangugi@cornell.edu

In this panel we are interested in thinking through questions around publishing and African literature. Some of the questions will include: How did missionary publishing contribute to the African literary tradition? What was the impact of the consensus to use European languages on writing in African languages? What have been the effects of say Heinemann on the growth of the African literary tradition? What has been the role of translation in the production of African culture? What have been the effects of digital platforms on the African literary tradition? 300-word abstracts plus short bio, by December 22, 2018, to Mukoma Wa Ngugi (mukomangugi@cornell.edu) and Ketu Katrak (khkatrak@uci.edu). Abstract should be 2000 characters or less.

Human Rights and Children in African Literature:
Session type:
Roundtable
Organized by: Mukoma Wa Ngugi
Send abstracts or inquiries to:
mukomanggugi@cornell.edu

Representations in African literature (memoirs, fiction, poetry and films) of the violation of children's human rights, including such topics as child soldiers, child migrants, and child abuse. Do children have a right to read and learn in their mother tongues? Is speaking in one's mother tongue a human right? 300-word abstracts plus short bio, by December 15, 2018, to Joya Uraizee (joya.uraizee@slu.edu)

Gendering the African Novel: Creativity, Theory and Women’s Identities
Session type:
Roundtable
Organized by: Rose A. Sackeyfio
Send abstracts or inquiries to:
sackeyfior@wssu.edu

The 45th meeting of the annual African Literature Association will engage broad themes of the institutions of African literature, future, present and past. Since the mid 20th century, African women’s creative artistry has garnered critical acclaim through distinguished awards, best-selling fiction and penetrating insight into women’s experiences. Women’s literary expression began as a form of ‘writing back’ to stereotypical and one-dimensional portrayals of females in male-authored texts during the early years of Anglophone African writing. However, several decades of writing by female authors has energized a thriving genre that re-shapes the trajectory of postcolonial literature by authors from Africa. Another exciting development is the prominence of leading women writers that take center stage on the literary landscape of contemporary African fiction. The emergence of female scholars, critics and publishers adds to this dynamic wellspring of gendered perspectives that enrich the literary studies of African, Women’s and World literature. Over time, conventional postcolonial themes intersect with 21st century perspectives that examine feminist expression, transnational identities and social transformation to achieve women’s equality. In the global age, African women’s writing has shifted the direction of the African novel in ways that foreground women’s identities beyond Africa’s borders in the 21st century. This panel seeks proposals that interrogate the evolution of African women’s writing through the influence of feminist theory, the local and global dynamics of publishing, and the artistic expression of an array of successful African female writers.

Bernth Lindfors and the Institutions of African Literary Criticism
Session type:
Panel
Organized by: Supriya M. Nair
Send abstracts or inquiries to:
smnair@umich.edu

This session invites paper proposals of no more than 2000 characters on the intellectual, professional, and institutional contributions of Bernth Lindfors, founding editor of the journal Research in African Literatures. Selected papers from the panel may be considered for publication in the The Journal of The African Literature Association (JALA).
Deadline to submit abstracts December 1, 2018.
Please email smnair@umich.edu

This page is intended to assist those who would like to collaborate with other members to organize panel, roundtable, and seminar proposals. Scroll down to see session CFPs.


For participants wanting to join a proposed session

If you would like to submit your abstract for consideration for one of the sessions listed below, please contact the session organizer directly, using the email address provided in the CFP. Please do not contact the ALA about session CFPs.


For session organizers

If you would like to organize a panel, roundtable, or seminar, but need others to join you, please consider posting a mini-call for papers here. You will need to formulate a working title for your session, a short abstract, and instructions for others to send you their own abstracts for consideration. To create your post, click here.

After you have gathered abstracts and composed your session, you will need to submit the complete panel, roundtable, or seminar proposal for consideration here.


Policies

The ALA does not endorse any CFP and bears no responsibility for monitoring the content of CFPs.

Please note that, if your session proposal is accepted, every presenter will be required to complete conference registration and to be a paid-up ALA member.